2007 Latin American Telecommunications Market

Publication Overview

This annual report offers a wealth of information on the regulatory background and fixed-line markets in Latin America. Subjects covered include:

  • Key statistics for all telecom sectors;
  • Telecom market overview and analysis;
  • Government policies, regulatory issues, and recent developments;
  • Fixed-line statistics and trends;
  • National telecom networks;
  • International infrastructure, submarine cables, and satellite connectivity;
  • Infrastructure developments;
  • Brief overviews on all of the major fixed-line telecom operators in each Latin American country.

Executive Summary

This Latin American market report takes an overall look at the various telecoms markets of Latin America. In particular, it covers the regulatory developments and fixed-line segments in each of the following economies: Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, and the smaller Caribbean island nations. The region’s major markets include:


Argentina

Argentina has one of the most solid state-of-the-art telecom infrastructures in South America. All telephony services are open to competition, requiring a single licence for any type of service. For 2007, the telecom regulator SeCom intends to focus on the satellite venture ArSat and the development of regulations for digital terrestrial TV. SeCom has acknowledged the need for a new telecom law to resolve the issue of convergence (triple play services), but does not consider it a priority.

Fixed-line teledensity in Argentina is stagnating at around 22%, similar to Brazil and Chile. Like elsewhere in Latin America, the shift is away from traditional telephony towards mobility. The country’s incumbents Telefónica de Argentina and Telecom Argentina still dominate the country’s fixed network, but long distance telephony is highly competitive.


Brazil

As in other Latin American countries, mobile and broadband are the fastest growing telecom sectors in Brazil, while local fixed-line telephony stagnates. New developments in the regulatory scenario include the approval of number portability, the introduction of per-minute billing, the adoption of digital terrestrial TV, the preparations for 3G licensing, and the planned new laws on media convergence, among others.

At around 19%, Brazil’s teledensity is extremely low compared with North America and Europe, but it is about average for Latin America. The country’s fixed-lines in service have been shrinking at an average rate of 2.8% a year from 2004 to 2006, losing customers to mobile telephony, while higher income households disconnect narrowband lines in favour of broadband, and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services grow ever more popular. Four incumbents (Telesp, Telemar, Brasil Telecom, and Embratel) dominate the fixed-line market in their respective regions.


Chile

Thanks to a healthy economy and early market liberalization, Chile’s telecom market is the most mature in Latin America. A high level of development has been achieved through investment, competition, and innovation. Chile is the regional leader in terms of mobile penetration (around 81%), Internet user penetration (around 40%), and broadband penetration (over 6%). Telecoms laws need to be amended, however, in view of technological innovations and the use of multi-service networks. Regulatory issues include number portability, Local Loop Unbundling (LLU), Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), WiMAX, tariff deregulation, and convergence. VoIP and Wireless Local Loop (WLL) have been the subject of lengthy legal battles between operators.

Chile boasts a modern fixed-line network, fully digitised since 1993. Yet, mostly due to fixed-mobile substitution, the fixed-line sector remains flat. The local telephony market is served by 12 operating companies, with incumbent Telefónica Chile holding 70% of all lines in service. Cable TV operator and triple player VTR GlobalCom is the number two local telephony provider, with a 12% share. The long-distance sector is one of the most competitive in Latin America, despite ongoing consolidation.


Colombia

While the Colombian market is open to competition, privatisation has been complicated by the structure of the local telephony market, which comprises some 30 publicly owned operating companies as well as several small municipal telecom operators. In April 2006, after years of thwarted privatisation efforts, the government finally sold a controlling stake in the country’s long-distance telephony incumbent, Colombia Telecom (renamed Telefónica Telecom), to Spain’s Telefónica.

Teledensity in Colombia is around 17%, slightly lower than average for Latin America. Most telephone lines are concentrated in the four largest cities, where teledensity tops 30%. But in some parts of the country, teledensity is below 10%. The number of fixed lines in service has been stagnating or even decreasing, primarily due to the shift towards alternative technologies and mobile phones.


Mexico

During 2006, there were a number of positive amendments to Mexico’s telecom regulations and competition laws. However, Mexico will soon be one of only two OECD countries yet to implement local loop unbundling. In addition, the regulator Cofetel needs greater independence and power if it is to properly foster a more competitive market. Basic telephony is still practically a monopoly, with Teléfonos de Mexico (Telmex) holding around 92% of all lines in service. Telmex’s sister company América Móvil dominates the mobile sector through its unit Telcel, which has around 77% of the market.

Mexico’s fixed-line teledensity is around 19%, which is about average for Latin America, but growth in fixed lines has been steadily declining, from 13% in 2000 to around 2% in 2006. Indeed, estimates for 2006 suggest that teledensity decreased for the first time. In addition, there are significant disparities between urban and rural areas, ranging from 42% teledensity in the Federal District to 6% in the state of Chiapas. VoIP is gaining popularity, although Cofetel imposes the same licensing requirements on VoIP providers as on other voice carriers, and has shut down numerous unlicensed VoIP operators.


Peru

The Peruvian telecom market has considerable scope for growth in both the fixed line and the mobile sectors, which are underdeveloped even taking into account the country’s low GDP. Although the telecom market is fully open to competition, it is still heavily dominated by Telefónica del Perú (TdP). Changes to Peruvian telecom law that are in the pipeline include the introduction of number portability and the adoption of a single concession licence. A contract renegotiation agreement between the government and TdP, signed in December 2006, has brought about price cuts for consumers and a sizeable investment commitment from TdP.

While local telephony is dominated by TdP, which owns about 96% of all lines in service, long-distance telephony is highly competitive, stimulated by a multicarrier system. Besides TdP, the main long-distance carriers are Telmex Perú, IDT Perú, Americatel Perú, and Impsat Perú.


Venezuela

Venezuela’s telecom industry is considered one of the fastest growing ones in Latin America. After the oil industry, the telecom sector is the second most important industry in the country. The country’s telecom incumbent CANTV was privatised in December 1991, and the fixed-line market was liberalised in November 2000. But, in January 2007, the Venezuelan government declared that CANTV would be re-nationalised. It agreed to pay Verizon US$572 million for its 28.5% stake in the operator, and said it would launch tender offers in Venezuela and the USA for the remaining shares. One of the main grievances against CANTV was that it had only developed its networks in the more densely populated and affluent northern region, and had failed to provide telecom service to the less profitable south.

Venezuela’s fixed-line teledensity is lower than average for Latin America. CANTV owns most of the national telecom infrastructure, although its share of fixed lines in service has decreased from 100% in 1999, to 79% in 2006. Besides CANTV, there are about 5 local telephony operators and 11 long distance operators. Several new entrants have resorted to WLL technology.

Table of Contents

1.OVERVIEW OF THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS MARKET IN LATIN AMERICA
1.1Telecom market overview
1.2Infrastructure
1.2.1VoIP
1.3Major telecom players
2.ARGENTINA
2.1Overview of Argentina’s telecom market
2.2Telecom network operators in Argentina
2.2.1Overview of operators
2.2.2Telefónica de Argentina (TASA)
2.2.3Telecom Argentina
2.2.4Telmex Argentina
2.2.5Comsat Argentina
2.2.6Impsat
2.2.7IPLAN
2.3Telecommunications infrastructure
2.3.1National telecom network
2.3.2International infrastructure
2.3.3Infrastructure developments
3.BELIZE
3.1Overview of Belize’s telecom market
3.2Fixed network operators in Belize
3.2.1Overview of operators
3.2.2Belize Telecommunications Ltd (BTL)
3.3Telecommunications infrastructure
3.3.1National telecom network
3.3.2Infrastructure developments
3.3.3International infrastructure
4.BOLIVIA
4.1Overview of Bolivia’s telecom market
4.2Fixed network operators in Bolivia
4.2.1Overview of operators
4.2.2Entel
4.2.3Cooperatives
4.3Telecommunications infrastructure
4.3.1National telecom network
4.3.2International infrastructure
4.3.3Infrastructure developments
5.BRAZIL
5.1Overview of Brazil’s telecom market
5.2Telecom network operators in Brazil
5.2.1Overview of fixed network market
5.2.2Telemar
5.2.3Brasil Telecom
5.2.4Telesp
5.2.5Embratel
5.2.6Global Village Telecom (GVT)
5.2.7Intelig Telecom
5.2.8CTBC Telecom
5.2.9Sercomtel
5.3Telecommunications infrastructure
5.3.1National telecom networks
5.3.2International infrastructure
5.3.3Infrastructure developments
6.CARIBBEAN COUNTRIES
6.1Overview of the Caribbean countries telecom market
6.2Major telecom operators in the Caribbean
6.2.1Cable & Wireless
6.2.2Digicel
6.3Telecommunications infrastructure
6.3.1National telecom network
6.3.2International infrastructure
7.CHILE
7.1Overview of Chile’s telecom market
7.2Telecom network operators in Chile
7.2.1Overview of operators
7.2.2Telefónica Chile
7.2.3Entel Chile
7.2.4VTR Globalcom
7.2.5Telefónica del Sur (Telsur)
7.2.6Telmex
7.2.7GTD Manquehue
7.3Telecommunications infrastructure
7.3.1National telecom networks
7.3.2International infrastructure
7.3.3Infrastructure developments
8.COLOMBIA
8.1Overview of Colombia’s telecom market
8.2Fixed network operators in Colombia
8.2.1Overview of operators
8.2.2Telefónica Telecom (previously Colombia Telecom)
8.2.3ETB
8.2.4EPM
8.2.5Emcali
8.2.6Telmex Colombia
8.3Telecommunications infrastructure
8.3.1National telecom network
8.3.2International infrastructure
8.3.3Infrastructure developments
9.COSTA RICA
9.1Overview of Costa Rica’s telecom market
9.2Fixed network operators in Costa Rica
9.2.1Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE)
9.3Telecommunications infrastructure
9.3.1National telecom network
9.3.2International infrastructure
9.3.3Infrastructure developments
10.CUBA
10.1Overview of Cuba’s telecom market
10.2Fixed network operator in Cuba
10.2.1Empresa de Telecomunicaciones del Cuba SA (Etecsa)
10.3Telecommunications infrastructure
10.3.1National telecom network
10.3.2International infrastructure
11.DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
11.1Overview of the Dominican Republic’s telecom market
11.2Fixed network operators in the Dominican Republic
11.2.1Overview of operators
11.2.2Codetel (formerly Verizon Dominicana)
11.2.3Tricom
11.2.4Centennial Dominicana
11.2.5Turitel SA
11.2.6Economitel
11.3Telecommunications infrastructure
11.3.1National telecom network
11.3.2International infrastructure
11.3.3Infrastructure developments
12.ECUADOR
12.1Overview of Ecuador’s telecom market
12.2Fixed network operators in Ecuador
12.2.1Overview of operators
12.2.2Andinatel
12.2.3Pacifictel
12.2.4Etapa
12.2.5Linkotel
12.3Telecommunications infrastructure
12.3.1National telecom network
12.3.2International infrastructure
12.3.3Infrastructure developments
13.EL SALVADOR
13.1Overview of El Salvador’s telecom market
13.2Fixed network operators in El Salvador
13.2.1Overview of operators
13.2.2CTE Telecom (América Móvil)
13.2.3Telefónica
13.3Telecommunications infrastructure
13.3.1National telecom network
13.3.2International infrastructure
13.3.3Infrastructure developments
14.GUATEMALA
14.1Overview of Guatemala’s telecom market
14.2Fixed network operators in Guatemala
14.2.1Overview of operators
14.2.2Telgua (América Móvil)
14.2.3TEM Guatemala
14.3Telecommunications infrastructure
14.3.1National telecom network
14.3.2International infrastructure
14.3.3Infrastructure developments
15.GUYANA
15.1Overview of Guyana’s telecom market
15.2Telecom network operator in Guyana
15.2.1Guyana Telephone and Telegraph (GT&T)
15.3Telecommunications infrastructure
15.3.1National telecom network
15.3.2International
16.HAITI
16.1Overview of Haiti’s telecom market
16.2Fixed network operator in Haiti
16.2.1Telecommunications D’Haiti (Teleco)
16.3Telecommunications infrastructure
16.3.1National telecom network
16.3.2International infrastructure
17.HONDURAS
17.1Overview of the Honduran telecom market
17.2Fixed network operators in Honduras
17.2.1Empresa Hondureña de Telecomunicaciones (Hondutel)
17.2.2Multifon
17.2.3Tele+ (Comunitel)
17.3Telecommunications infrastructure
17.3.1National telecom network
17.3.2International infrastructure
17.3.3Infrastructure developments
18.JAMAICA
18.1Overview of Jamaica’s telecom market
18.2Fixed network operators in Jamaica
18.2.1Overview of operators
18.2.2Cable & Wireless Jamaica (C&WJ)
18.2.3GoTel Communications Ltd
18.3Telecommunications infrastructure
18.3.1National telecom network
18.3.2International infrastructure
18.3.3Infrastructure developments
19.MEXICO
19.1Overview of Mexico’s telecom market
19.1.1Market analysis – 2006
19.2Fixed network operators in Mexico
19.2.1Market overview
19.2.2Teléfonos de México (Telmex)
19.2.3Alestra
19.2.4Axtel
19.2.5Maxcom
19.2.6Marcatel
19.2.7Iusatel
19.2.8Protel
19.2.9Megacable
19.3Telecommunications infrastructure
19.3.1National telecom network
19.3.2International infrastructure
19.3.3Infrastructure developments
20.NICARAGUA
20.1Overview of Nicaragua’s telecom market
20.2Fixed network operators in Nicaragua
20.2.1Empresa Nicaragüense de Telecomunicaciones (Enitel)
20.2.2Movistar (Telefónica)
20.3Telecommunications infrastructure
20.3.1National telecom network
20.3.2International infrastructure
20.3.3Infrastructure developments
21.PANAMA
21.1Overview of Panama’s telecom market
21.2Fixed network operators in Panama
21.2.1Cable & Wireless Panamá (C&WP)
21.2.2Telecarrier
21.2.3Galaxy Communications Corp (ClaroCOM)
21.2.4Advanced Communication Network
21.2.5Optynex Telecom
21.3Telecommunications infrastructure
21.3.1National telecom network
21.3.2International infrastructure
21.3.3Infrastructure developments
22.PARAGUAY
22.1Overview of Paraguay’s telecom market
22.2Telecom network operators in Paraguay
22.2.1Copaco
22.3Telecommunications infrastructure
22.3.1National telecom network
22.3.2International infrastructure
22.3.3Infrastructure developments
23.PERU
23.1Overview of Peru’s telecom market
23.2Fixed network operators in Peru
23.2.1Overview of operators
23.2.2Telefónica del Perú (TdP)
23.2.3Movistar Perú (was Comunicaciones Móviles del Perú/BellSouth)
23.2.4Telmex Perú
23.2.5IDT Perú
23.2.6Americatel Perú
23.2.7Gilat To Home Perú
23.3Telecommunications infrastructure
23.3.1National telecom network
23.3.2International infrastructure
23.3.3Infrastructure developments
24.PUERTO RICO
24.1Overview of Puerto Rico’s telecom market
24.2Fixed network operators in Puerto Rico
24.2.1Introduction
24.2.2Puerto Rico Telephone Company (PRTC)
24.2.3Centennial de Puerto Rico (CPR)
24.2.4Telefónica Larga Distancia de Puerto Rico (TLD)
24.3Telecommunications infrastructure
24.3.1National telecom network
24.3.2International infrastructure
24.3.3Infrastructure developments
25.SURINAME
25.1Overview of Suriname’s telecom market
25.2Telecom network operator in Suriname
25.2.1Telesur
25.3Telecommunications infrastructure
25.3.1National telecom network
25.3.2International infrastructure
25.3.3Infrastructure developments
26.URUGUAY
26.1Overview of Uruguay’s telecom market
26.2Telecom network operators in Uruguay
26.2.1Overview of operators
26.2.2Antel
26.3Telecommunications infrastructure
26.3.1National telecom network
26.3.2International infrastructure
27.VENEZUELA
27.1Overview of Venezuela’s telecom market
27.2Telecom network operators in Venezuela
27.2.1Overview of operators
27.2.2CANTV
27.2.3Movistar (Telefónica)
27.2.4Digitel
27.2.5NetUno (previously Veninfotel)
27.2.6New Global Telecom Venezuela (NGTV)
27.2.7CVG Telecom
27.2.8Impsat Venezuela
27.3Telecommunications infrastructure
27.3.1National telecom network
27.3.2International infrastructure
27.3.3Infrastructure developments
28.GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS
Exhibit 1 – Regulatory status of VoIP in selected Latin American countries – 2007
Exhibit 2 – The recession of 2000 - 2002 in Argentina
Exhibit 3 – TASA at a glance
Exhibit 4 – Telecom Argentina at a glance
Exhibit 5 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Argentina
Exhibit 6 – Major submarine cable networks links in Belize
Exhibit 7 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Bolivia
Exhibit 8 – Regions of Brazil
Exhibit 9 – Telemar Norte Leste (Telemar) at a glance
Exhibit 10 – Brasil Telecom at a glance
Exhibit 11 – Telesp at a glance
Exhibit 12 – Embratel Participações at a glance
Exhibit 13 – Principal subsidiaries of Embratel Participações – February 2007
Exhibit 14 – Vésper – history
Exhibit 15 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Brazil
Exhibit 16 – Geostationary satellites operating in Brazil – February 2007
Exhibit 17 – Island territories of the Caribbean
Exhibit 18 – Digicel’s Caribbean operations – February 2007
Exhibit 19 – Major submarine cable networks serving the Caribbean region
Exhibit 20 – Regions and primary zones Chile
Exhibit 21 – Local telephony operators – number of zones of operation in Chile – March 2006
Exhibit 22 – Telefónica Chile at a glance
Exhibit 23 – Entel Chile at a glance
Exhibit 24 – VTR Globalcom at a glance
Exhibit 25 – Telsur at a glance
Exhibit 26 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Chile
Exhibit 27 – Telefónica Telecom at a glance
Exhibit 28 – Colombia Telecom company history
Exhibit 29 – Colombia Telecom privatisation
Exhibit 30 – EPM telecom subsidiaries
Exhibit 31 – Telmex Colombia company history
Exhibit 32 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Colombia
Exhibit 33 – Major submarine cable networks connecting Costa Rica
Exhibit 34 – Major submarine cable networks serving the Dominican Republic
Exhibit 35 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Ecuador
Exhibit 36 – Major submarine cable networks connecting Guatemala
Exhibit 37 – Major submarine cable networks connecting Honduras
Exhibit 38 – Major submarine cable networks serving Jamaica
Exhibit 39 – Fixed-line local telephony licence holders in Mexico – October 2006
Exhibit 40 – Fixed-wireless local telephony licence holders in Mexico – October 2006
Exhibit 41 – Long-distance licence holders in Mexico – June 2006
Exhibit 42 – Telmex at a glance
Exhibit 43 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Mexico
Exhibit 44 – Major submarine cable networks connecting Nicaragua
Exhibit 45 – Major submarine cable networks serving the Caribbean region
Exhibit 46 – Telefónica del Perú at a glance
Exhibit 47 – Telmex Perú company history
Exhibit 48 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Peru
Exhibit 49 – Major submarine cable networks serving Puerto Rico
Exhibit 50 - Licensed ILD operators in Uruguay – February 2007
Exhibit 51 – Major submarine cable networks connecting Uruguay
Exhibit 52 – CANTV at a glance
Exhibit 53 – The creation of CVG Telecom
Exhibit 54 – Major submarine cable networks landing in Venezuela


Table 1 – Top 10 Latin American countries for fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity – 2005 - 2006
Table 2 – Top ten fixed-line operators and annual change by revenue - 2006
Table 3 – Top ten fixed-line operators and annual change by lines in service - 2005 - 2006
Table 4 – Telephone network statistics in Argentina – 2006
Table 5 – TASA fixed lines in service and annual change – 2001 - 2006
Table 6 – Telecom Argentina fixed lines in service and annual change – 2000 - 2006
Table 7 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Argentina – 1996 - 2006
Table 8 – Public phones and annual change in Argentina – 1996 - 2006
Table 9 – Telephone network statistics in Belize – March 2006
Table 10 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Belize - 1996 - 2006
Table 11 – Fixed-line to mobile ratio in Bolivia – 1996 - 2006
Table 12 – Telephone network statistics in Bolivia – June 2006
Table 13 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Bolivia – 1996 - 2006
Table 14 – Public payphones and annual change in Bolivia - 1997 - 2006
Table 15 – Telephone network statistics in Brazil – 2006
Table 16 – Telemar fixed lines in service, digitisation and annual change – 1998 - 2006
Table 17 – Brasil Telecom fixed lines in service, digitisation and annual change – 1998 - 2006
Table 18 – Telesp fixed lines in service, digitisation and annual change – 1999 - 2006
Table 19 – Fixed lines in service, teledensity and annual change in Brazil – 1998 - 2006
Table 20 – Public payphones and annual change in Brazil – 1998 - 2006
Table 21 – Caribbean countries – fixed lines in service and teledensity - 2005
Table 22 – Telephone network statistics in Chile – 2006
Table 23 – Local telephony operators – lines and market share in Chile – March 2006
Table 24 – Entel and Telefónica Chile – market share of ILD and DLD traffic – 2001 - 2006
Table 25 – Telefónica Chile lines in service and annual change – 1999 - 2006
Table 26 – Entel lines in service and annual change – 2001 - 2006
Table 27 – VTR telephony subscribers and annual change – 2000 - 2006
Table 28 – Telsur lines in service and annual change – 1999 - 2006
Table 29 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Chile – 1995 - 2006
Table 30 – Public phones and annual change in Chile – 2000 - 2006
Table 31 – Telecom revenue and annual change in Colombia – 2000 - 2006
Table 32 – Telecom revenue by segment and annual change in Colombia – 2005
Table 33 – Telephone network statistics in Colombia – 2006
Table 34 – Fixed lines in service – major operators’ market share in Colombia – 2000 - 2006
Table 35 – DLD traffic – market share by operator in Colombia – 1999 - 2006
Table 36 – ILD traffic – market share by operator in Colombia – 1999 - 2006
Table 37 – Telefónica Telecom lines in service – 2000 - 2006
Table 38 – ETB lines in service – 2000 - 2006
Table 39 – EPM lines in service and annual change – 2000 - 2006
Table 40 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Colombia – 1996 - 2006
Table 41 – Telephone network statistics in Costa Rica – 2005
Table 42 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Costa Rica – 1996 - 2005
Table 43 – Public payphones and annual change in Costa Rica – 2000 - 2005
Table 44 – Telephone network statistics in Cuba – 2006
Table 45 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Cuba – 1996 - 2006
Table 46 – Telephone network statistics in the Dominican Republic – July 2006
Table 47 – Codetel fixed lines in service and annual change – 1996 - 2006
Table 48 – Tricom fixed lines in service and annual change – 1998 - 2005
Table 49 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in the Dominican Republic - 1997 - 2006
Table 50 – Public phones and annual change in the Dominican Republic - 1997 - 2006
Table 51 – WLL lines in service and annual change in the Dominican Republic – 1999 - 2006
Table 52 – Telephone network statistics in Ecuador – 2006
Table 53 – Market share of mainlines in service by operator in Ecuador – 2001 - 2006
Table 54 – Andinatel lines in service, annual change and digitisation – 2001 - 2006
Table 55 – Pacifictel lines in service, annual change and digitisation – 2001 - 2006
Table 56 – Etapa lines in service, annual change and digitisation – 2001 - 2006
Table 57 – Linkotel lines in service, annual change and digitisation – 2004 - 2006
Table 58 – Fixed lines in service, annual change, teledensity and digitisation - 1996 - 2006
Table 59 – Public telephones and annual change in Ecuador – 2003 - 2006
Table 60 – Telephone network statistics in El Salvador – June 2006
Table 61 – Telecom – lines in service and annual change – 2003 - 2006
Table 62 – Telefónica fixed and fixed-wireless lines in service and annual change – 2003 - 2006
Table 63 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in El Salvador – 1996 - 2006
Table 64 – Public payphones and annual change in El Salvador – 1998 - 2006
Table 65 – Telephone network statistics in Guatemala – June 2006
Table 66 – Fixed-line market share by operator in Guatemala – 2002 - 2006
Table 67 – Fixed lines in service, teledensity and annual change in Guatemala – 1996 - 2006
Table 68 – Public and community phones in Guatemala – 2003 - 2006
Table 69 – Telephone network statistics in Guyana – September 2006
Table 70 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Guyana - 1997 - 2006
Table 71 – Telephone network statistics in Haiti – 2005
Table 72 - Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Haiti – 1998 - 2005
Table 73 – Telecom revenue and investment statistics in Honduras – 2005
Table 74 – Telephone network statistics in Honduras – June 2006
Table 75 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Honduras - 1997 - 2006
Table 76 – Public telephones and annual change in Honduras - 1997 - 2005
Table 77 – Telephone network statistics in Jamaica – 2006
Table 78 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Jamaica - 1996 - 2006
Table 79 – Telecom revenue and investment statistics in Mexico – 2006
Table 80 – Telephone network statistics in Mexico – 2006
Table 81 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Mexico – 1996 - 2006
Table 82 – Telmex lines in service and annual change - 1997 - 2006
Table 83 – Alestra lines in service and annual change - 1999 - 2006
Table 84 – Axtel lines in service and annual change - 2002 - 2006
Table 85 – Maxcom lines in service and annual change - 2001 - 2006
Table 86 – Telephone network statistics in Nicaragua – March 2006
Table 87 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Nicaragua - 1996 - 2006
Table 88 – Public phones and annual change in Nicaragua – 1998 - 2006
Table 89 – Telephone network statistics in Panama – 2005
Table 90 – Number of telecom concessions in Panama - March 2006
Table 91 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Panama - 1998 - 2005
Table 92 – Public telephones and annual change in Panama - 1998 - 2005
Table 93 – Telephone network statistics in Paraguay – 2005
Table 94 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Paraguay - 2000 - 2005
Table 95 – Number of operators per service in Peru – 2006
Table 96 – Telecom revenue and investment statistics in Peru – 2005
Table 97 – Telephone network statistics in Peru – 2006
Table 98 – Fixed lines in service by operator in Peru – 2001 - 2006
Table 99 – Fixed-line market share by operator in Peru – 2001 - 2006
Table 100 – Share of domestic long-distance traffic (top five operators) in Peru – 2001 - 2006
Table 101 – Share of international long-distance outgoing traffic (top five operators) in Peru – 2001 - 2006
Table 102 – TdP fixed lines in service and annual change – 2001 - 2006
Table 103 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Peru - 1995 - 2006
Table 104 – Public phones and annual change in Peru – 1997 - 2006
Table 105 – FITEL Rural Projects Program – 2006
Table 106 – Telephone network statistics in Puerto Rico – 2006
Table 107 – PRTC residential & corporate fixed lines in service and annual change - 1998 - 2006
Table 108 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity in Puerto Rico - 1996 - 2005
Table 109 – Telephone network statistics in Suriname – 2005
Table 110 – Fixed lines in service, teledensity and annual change in Suriname – 1997 - 2005
Table 111 – Telephone network statistics in Uruguay – 2005
Table 112 – Fixed lines in service, teledensity and annual change in Uruguay – 1997 - 2005
Table 113 – Telecom revenue and investment statistics in Venezuela – 2006
Table 114 – Telephone network statistics in Venezuela – June 2006
Table 115 – Fixed-line market share by operator in Venezuela – 2003 - 2006
Table 116 – Fixed-line prepaid/postpaid ratio in Venezuela - 2001 - 2006
Table 117 – CANTV fixed-lines in service and annual change - 1998 - 2006
Table 118 – Movistar WLL lines and annual change - 2004 - 2006
Table 119 – Fixed lines in service, annual change, and teledensity in Venezuela - 1997 - 2006
Table 120 – Public payphones and annual change in Venezuela – 1997 - 2006

Related Reports

Purchase this Report

US$250.00

Licence Information

Annual Publication Profile

Technologies

Strategies & Analyses (Industry & Markets)
Telecoms Infrastructure

Number of pages 222

Status Archived

Last updated 9 May 2007
Update History

Analyst: Stephen McNamara

Share this Report

Purchase with Confidence

Paul, May I congratulate you on a very successful and enjoyable afternoon with the Minister. In providing the roundtable discussions between government and industry, it highlighted the strong interest by stakeholders in Broadband and its implementation but it also presented us with other issues and opportunities that we need to address.

Dominic Schipano, CITT

Special Offers

Iran - Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband - Statistics and Analyses
US$375.00 until 10 Jul 2019
(normal price US$750.00)

Jordan - Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband - Statistics and Analyses
US$375.00 until 10 Jul 2019
(normal price US$750.00)

Global Telecoms - Key Trends for 2019 - IoT, Data Management, 5G and AI
US$1,000.00 until 26 Jun 2019
(normal price US$2,000.00)

Global Smart Cities - Planning for a Sustainable Future - Analysis and Trends
US$795.00 until 26 Jun 2019
(normal price US$1,590.00)

Sample Reports

A selection of downloadable samples from our Annual Publications catalogue.


Download a Sample Report

More than 4,000 customers from 140 countries utilise BuddeComm Research

Are you interested in BuddeComm's Custom Research Service?

News & Views

Have the latest telecommunications industry news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to Paul's FREE weekly News & Views.