2012 Australia - The Emerging Smart City Market

Publication Overview

This report first goes into detail about the two key infrastructure elements needed for smart communities, high-speed telecommunications infrastructure and smart grids. It describes the developments that are taking place in Australia. It also highlights the role of both federal and local government and key elements of smart communities, such as e-health, e-education, e-government, smart transport and smart cars. In addition it addresses policy issues needed to move these developments further and explains how this will have an effect on the social and economic developments of local communities, and indeed on the country as a whole.

Researchers:- Paul Budde, Stephen McNamara, Kylie Wansink
Current publication date:- February 2012 (1st Edition)

Executive Summary

Smart Cities: sustainable engines for growth

The concept of smart communities is based on intelligent infrastructure such as broadband (FttH) and smart grids, so that connected and sustainable communities can be developed. However, before these smart communities can be built trans-sector policies and strategies need to be developed.

They cannot be built within the silo structure that currently dominates our thinking; a holistic approach is needed – one that includes environmental issues such as self-sufficient energy buildings, exchanges for renewable energy and e-cars, delivery of e-health, e-education and e-government services, as well as digital media and internet services.

The world is facing a significant number of challenges. The key problem associated with these challenges is a lack of smart government policies based on integrated solutions that cross sector boundaries. Political leadership is needed to address these issues. Over the last few years citizens all round the world have indicated that they are ready for change. We have seen this in relation to climate change and the use of new and modern means of communication.

BuddeComm has argued that we can solve the challenges at hand, but we will have to do things differently. There is no linear way forward – lateral solutions are needed. Over the last 60 years we have created a world of specialists who operate within silos. These silos need to be demolished and new horizontal structures established in which all sectors and disciplines work together.

Leadership from the top is needed if this is to be achieved. It is called the trans-sector approach, and ICT is the glue needed to build more horizontal collaborative structures. Whether we are talking about smart cities, smart transport, smart grids, smart buildings or e-health – what is needed is good data that can be analysed in real time, allowing people and/or machines to make instant decisions in relation to energy efficiency, traffic situations, weather activities, and personal health issues, as well as commercial decisions. The infrastructure that can be used to link sectors together in a dynamic way is referred to as M2M or the internet of things.

The only large-scale national infrastructure example of such an integrated policy is unfolding in Australia, where the government is rolling out a national broadband network based on those trans-sector principles. However, given the failure of some of the ad hoc solutions in relation to sustainability policies, this concept needs to be extended even further – the entire infrastructure should be structured around cohesive policies. Both the electricity grid and the NBN are critical elements in this and they should be used as infrastructure building blocks for a smart country, smart cities and communities and smart buildings.

In many cities around the world high density living is the norm and attention is now turning towards making this style of living more sustainable. Technological innovations include water harvesting and reuse, and solar collection and energy-efficient appliances, including those used for heating and cooling. Sustainable urban transport systems are also on the agenda for many governments.

Good government policies are the key to success.

  • In healthcare alone there are hundreds of silos of specialists who are unwilling to share information and work together.
  • By law utilities are not allow to share the data that would make it possible to more effectively manage their water, energy, gas and other infrastructure.
  • Regulations also make it impossible for other industries to generate energy (for example, on their factory roofs) and share that with the neighbouring community.
  • The current energy network is completely unprepared for the management of PV systems and for the approaching marketing blitz of smart cars.
  • Privacy laws need to be rewritten to make data-sharing possible according to permission-based policies (the users should own their own data, not the utility, health provider, etc).
  • The 17th century-based International Property Right system needs to be changed, opened up to innovation and flexibility, and aimed at advancing knowledge and thus advancing our society in order to face the challenging future.
  • Governments should develop clear vision statements on how they will use smart ICT tools and infrastructure to build smart countries, cities, communities and buildings.
  • Local government policies are needed to prepare their communities for these developments – both at an infrastructure level and through education and information regarding the social and economic changes that are needed to obtain the full benefit from these digital opportunities.

This report first goes into detail about the two key infrastructure elements needed for smart communities, high-speed telecommunications infrastructure and smart grids. It describes the developments that are taking place in Australia. It also highlights the role of both federal and local government and key elements of smart communities, such as e-health, e-education, e-government, smart transport and smart cars. In addition it addresses policy issues needed to move these developments further and explains how this will have an effect on the social and economic developments of local communities, and indeed on the country as a whole.

Market Highlights:

  • Addressing today’s economic, environmental, healthcare and education challenges
  • The smart city concept requires new ways of government and industry thinking
  • Comprehensive and interconnected policies and strategies are needed
  • The key role of local councils in these developments
  • Good visionary examples are coming from Asia
  • Shared broadband and smart grid infrastructure are the backbone of smart cities
  • Facilitating e-health, e-education, e-government, digital media, smart transport, etc.

Table of Contents

  • 1. The Social and Economic Impact of the Digital Revolution
    • 1.1 Politicians underestimate the digital revolution
    • 1.2 How governments lost the ICT plot
    • 1.3 Desperate need for government innovation
    • 1.4 Politicians should stop populist party politics
    • 1.5 Urgent need for smart policies and smart tools
    • 1.6 the need for Digital infrastructure
    • 1.7 NBN a blueprint for other trans-sector policies?
    • 1.8 Australia’s international PV success story
    • 1.9 Citizens understand the crisis
    • 1.10 No progress without new trans-sector policies
    • 1.11 Conclusions
  • 2. The Smart City Market
    • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.1.1 Smart cities, smart countries
      • 2.1.2 Connected communities
      • 2.1.3 Smart communities – where to start?
      • 2.1.4 Intelligent Communities Forum
    • 2.2 Global Overviews
      • 2.2.1 Asia
      • 2.2.2 North America
      • 2.2.3 Europe
    • 2.3 Australia
      • 2.3.1 Intelligent infrastructure
      • 2.3.2 Rolling out infrastructure the smart way
      • 2.3.3 We lack the structures to implement trans-sector visions
  • 3. The Trans-sector Concept
    • 3.1 The need for NBN-based trans-sector policies
      • 3.1.1 Parliamentary commission calls for trans-sector policies
      • 3.1.2 Productivity Commission wants to see trans-sector policies
    • 3.2 The key sectors
      • 3.2.1 Background information
      • 3.2.2 Telecommunications
      • 3.2.3 Media
      • 3.2.4 Government services
      • 3.2.5 Healthcare
      • 3.2.6 E-education and e-science
      • 3.2.7 Smart grids
      • 3.2.8 Business
    • 3.3 Introduction to trans-sector thinking
      • 3.3.1 Fragmented society requires cohesive leadership
      • 3.3.2 Problems in most silos
      • 3.3.3 National welfare depends on new ways of thinking
    • 3.4 A matter of leadership
      • 3.4.1 Vision without execution powers
      • 3.4.2 Industry cooperation leading the way
      • 3.4.3 Work in progress: political leadership
      • 3.4.4 Trans-sector thinking at highest levels in Australia
      • 3.4.5 Towards trans-sector government
  • 4. The Internet of Things
    • 4.1 Statistical information
    • 4.2 Staggering IoT predictions
    • 4.3 Analysis - Who will dominate the IoT market?
    • 4.4 Building smart communities and smart countries
      • 4.4.1 Stage one - infrastructure
      • 4.4.2 Stage two – trans-sector policies
      • 4.4.3 Stage three - the business game-changer
    • 4.5 Key trends and Developments
      • 4.5.1 Deep packet inspection
      • 4.5.2 Ubiquitous Complex Event Processing
      • 4.5.3 Behavioural Attitudinal Geolocation
      • 4.5.4 Lifetime customer relationships
    • 4.6 Smart cities and smart countries
      • 4.6.1 Electricity companies and the Internet of Things
      • 4.6.2 Data analytics solutions
    • 4.7 How do we get there?
    • 4.8 Change in services driven by Sensing and monitoring information
  • 5. The National Broadband Network
    • 5.1 Introduction and Overview
      • 5.1.1 General Overview of the Plan
      • 5.1.2 How Australia got its NBN
      • 5.1.3 Why shouldn’t we build the NBN?
      • 5.1.4 NBN National Infrastructure, not just Telecoms
      • 5.1.5 Economic Reforms
      • 5.1.6 Socio-economic benefits
      • 5.1.7 Where is the user in all of this?
      • 5.1.8 Why wireless broadband is no alternative to FttH
    • 5.2 Infrastructure Analysis
      • 5.2.1 Strategic Analysis
      • 5.2.2 Infrastructure backgrounder
    • 5.3 Municipal and Community Networks
      • 5.3.1 Local councils need to be more active in NBN development - analysis
      • 5.3.2 Case studies
      • 5.3.3 Trans-sector thinking and municipal broadband
      • 5.3.4 The role of local councils
      • 5.3.5 Cities are taking charge
      • 5.3.6 How to get started
      • 5.3.7 Broadband Development Phases
      • 5.3.8 City marketing
      • 5.3.9 Examples of tele-cities
      • 5.3.10 Communities left behind because of NBN party politics (Analysis)
  • 6. E-Health
    • 6.1 Market Overview
      • 6.1.1 E-health in the context of BuddeComm research
      • 6.1.2 Introduction e-health
      • 6.1.3 E-health and the NBN
      • 6.1.4 Digital economy benefits
      • 6.1.5 The national health reform
      • 6.1.6 Optimising e-health
      • 6.1.7 E-health – key to the success of NBN – analysis
    • 6.2 Initiatives, Pilots and Projects
      • 6.2.1 Public healthcare projects and pilots
      • 6.2.2 Digital Regions Initiative
      • 6.2.3 Other public initiatives
      • 6.2.4 R&D projects and initiatives
      • 6.2.5 Private initiatives
      • 6.2.6 Telstra’s e-health initiatives
  • 7. E-Education
    • 7.1 Education and the need for the National Broadband Network (NBN)
      • 7.1.1 Analysis on e-education initiatives
      • 7.1.2 E-education, the NBN and infrastructure
      • 7.1.3 The NBN-Enabled Education and Skills Services program
      • 7.1.4 NBN education portal
    • 7.2 New vision for e-education – 1:1 education
      • 7.2.1 Australia’s first trans-sector initiative
      • 7.2.2 A standardised e-education system
      • 7.2.3 Risk of failure – people, not technology
      • 7.2.4 Interactive and personalised education system
      • 7.2.5 Expanding the teaching profession
      • 7.2.6 From medieval schools to a digital society
      • 7.2.7 It is all about economic benefits
      • 7.2.8 From Notebooks to ThinkPads
    • 7.3 Remote laptops from One Laptop Per Child (OLPC)
    • 7.4 E-learning
      • 7.4.1 Funding for e-learning projects – 2010 - 2011
      • 7.4.2 Flexible learning framework assists with e-learning
      • 7.4.3 2010 E-learning Benchmarking Survey
    • 7.5 E-education infrastructure initiatives
      • 7.5.1 Background
      • 7.5.2 National government policy – Fibre-to-the-Home (FttH) to the schools
      • 7.5.3 An NBN for Catholic schools
      • 7.5.4 MySchool 2.0
      • 7.5.5 NSW schools get fast broadband
    • 7.6 E-education content in Australia
      • 7.6.1 Australia’s largest online library
      • 7.6.2 E-learning from Australian Computer Society (ACS)
      • 7.6.3 Media literacy
  • 8. E-Government
    • 8.1 Background information
    • 8.2 Local e-government initiative
    • 8.3 Cloud service a new growth market
    • 8.4 Survey on e-government services usage
    • 8.5 Conclusions
    • 8.6 Government deploys national TelePresence system
    • 8.7 Australia in the Global Innovation Index
  • 9. Smart Transport and Smart Cars
    • 9.1 Intelligent Transport Systems
    • 9.2 What are intelligent transport systems (ITS)?
      • 9.2.1 Background information
      • 9.2.2 Overview of ITS activities
    • 9.3 ITS Australia
      • 9.3.1 Overview
      • 9.3.2 Outcomes of ITS Summit, 2009
      • 9.3.3 Government Inquiry – 2002
    • 9.4 Industry developments
      • 9.4.1 Electronic transport diaries
      • 9.4.2 The SMART Infrastructure Facility
      • 9.4.3 Broadband extends to public transport
      • 9.4.4 Australian Road Research Board
    • 9.5 Dedicated short-range communications (DSRC)
      • 9.5.1 Overview of latest developments
      • 9.5.2 Regulatory framework – 2010
      • 9.5.3 eTags
      • 9.5.4 epay and Queensland Government motorway joint venture
    • 9.6 Smart transport and the National Broadband Network (NBN)
      • 9.6.1 NBN access for smart utility services
      • 9.6.2 Trans-sector approach to NBN
      • 9.6.3 Government’s smart infrastructure initiative
      • 9.6.4 Transport and energy use
      • 9.6.5 Managed Motorways
    • 9.7 Electric Vehicles
      • 9.7.1 The Electric Vehicle (EV) market in Australia
      • 9.7.2 The upcoming electric vehicle tsunami analysis
      • 9.7.3 Electric vehicles within Smart Grid/Smart City project
  • 10. Glossary of Abbreviations
  • Table 1 – Australian Flexible Learning Framework industry funding – 2005-2007; 2008 - 2011
  • Chart 1- Estimated government spend on aged care versus GDP – 2001; 2008 - 2010; 2040; 2050
  • Chart 2 – Uses of delivering e-learning training by businesses – 2010
  • Exhibit 1 - Internet of Things – the next infrastructure inflection point
  • Exhibit 2 - Trans-sector vs. Cross-sector
  • Exhibit 3 – Smart homes
  • Exhibit 4 – Oncor (TXU) and the Current Group - Texas
  • Exhibit 5 – Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) – California
  • Exhibit 6 – Xcel Energy’s Smart Grid City
  • Exhibit 7 – Southern California Edison, California
  • Exhibit 8 – American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 2009
  • Exhibit 9 – Smart shopping
  • Exhibit 10 – Economic benefits of broadband – overview of surveys
  • Exhibit 11 – Trans-sector benefits
  • Exhibit 12 – The social and economic benefits of broadband – case study
  • Exhibit 13 – Key Broadbanding Steps
  • Exhibit 14 – Some application bit rates
  • Exhibit 15 – Costs of e-health plan
  • Exhibit 16 – Funding for e-records
  • Exhibit 17 – PCEHR timeline – 2009 - 2014
  • Exhibit 18 – Working through record matching progress report – 2011
  • Exhibit 19 – Background information on the Clever Networks program
  • Exhibit 20 - Noise monotony in Melbourne
  • Exhibit 21 – eTags and tolls overview – 2011
  • Exhibit 22 - Learning from e-cars

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Technologies

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Number of pages 160

Status Archived

Last updated 1 Feb 2012
Update History

Analyst: Paul Budde

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