2012 Australia - Digital Entertainment and Media Market

Publication Overview

This annual report offers a wealth of information on the digital entertainment and media market in Australia. The report includes analyses, forecasts, statistics and trends. It provides a comprehensive insight into the progress of the various media internet and telco companies and examines the key issues in the market and the business opportunities arising from these developments.

Subjects covered include:

  • Activities from the key market players;
  • Analyses of internet media companies, with case studies;
  • Mobile media – the PSMS portals and the apps market;
  • Overview and analyses of the various players in the market;
  • Overview and analysis of the burgeoning social media market;
  • Smartphones and tablets;
  • Surveys and statistics on mobile media;
  • The competitive internet media environment;
  • The digital gaming and gambling market.

Researchers:- Paul Budde, Stephen McNamara, Kylie Wansink
Current publication date:- April 2012 (4th Edition)

Executive Summary

Will infrastructure constrain the digital entertainment market?

The digital media market is changing as it has been impacted upon many aspects of the media industry of old. These changes, combined with an economic downturn, led to much unrest in the media sector. Moving into digital entertainment there are several competing sectors. These sectors include – TV and radio broadcasting, newspaper publishers, the film and video industries – as well as the new internet-based companies.

The internet-based media companies are the clear leaders in the digital entertainment arena. However for the time being there are, to a certain extent, parallel developments – one driven by digital TV, using the traditional broadcasting networks, and one driven by broadband, using new fixed and mobile telco infrastructure.

The arrival of smart TV will bring about a much closer alignment of these two developments, which most certainly will lead to further disruptive developments in the industry. In this publication we describe and analyse the effect that digital media and convergence is having on the media industry.

While the traditional media has been on notice about the changes it has so far failed to take decisive action, partly because it has been afraid of cannibalisation and partly because its business models do not cater for swift business action. To date the result has been a decline in revenues, but far more importantly the traditional media companies have failed to seize a share of the new market that is now dominated by relative newcomers such as Google, YouTube and Facebook.

In Australia the national broadband network (NBN) will be the next playing arena. Once again the media has largely been absent from this debate but the NBN will create new changes with new options. The traditional media players can take a leadership role, such as looking at the trans-sector opportunities that the NBN has on offer – or they can simply copy their outdated models onto the NBN, perhaps by using the wholesale services of a telco.

Some initial indications are that they are looking at more of the same rather than moving towards media innovation. On the other hand, the traditional media companies do have strong brands and millions of (often unsigned) customers – but will they be able utilise this to their advantage?

In the past BuddeComm described triple play as being linked to the traditional business concept and the old telco way of thinking – that is, based on locking customers into their services rather than creating new customer benefits. In this publication we say we believe triple play should stand for the ability to deliver access to all forms of communication over the one connection. Telcos and ISPs need to make this possible, and of course media companies could join them in this. The services they can offer should be aligned with this open approach and should include security, storage, billing, and all kinds of extra enhancement, depending on the specific applications. The market is rapidly changing from one of broadcasting to one of narrowcasting.

In this publication BuddeComm also provides an analysis and market overview of the online video media and IPTV industry in Australia; and we give information on telcos around the world that have not been very successful in selling content. With devices such as smartphones, tablets and smart TVs the original triple play model will eventually disappear.

With the rollout of the NBN the telecommunications, entertainment, video and multimedia markets in Australia are undergoing sweeping changes. These are currently characterised by the increasing array of products and services that can be delivered to consumers over this infrastructure. The connected or smart TV will soon be a major entertainment hub of the digital home, with gigabit WiFi and WiFi repeaters bringing signals to laptops, tablets and smartphones around the house.

This will mean that subscription TV and cable TV operators, telecommunications firms, consumer electronics and IT companies will all be competing to provide various digital media services. These services require a large amount of bandwidth, and they are typically delivered over high-speed connections based on fibre optical or hybrid-fibre-coaxial (HFC) networks. In many markets access to fibre-to-the-home networks (FttH) have not been priced attractively enough to appeal to a large number of customers. However the NBN is changing this in Australia – it will attract large numbers of users, as well as new service and content providers. There will be a range of different offerings that will provide competitive access to a variety of services and, as such, triple play as an access solution is becoming a vanilla product rather than an upfront sales channel.

We also provide a brief overview of the major players in the industry, with some statistics and analysis along with results from recent industry surveys.

The telcos were the first cabs off the rank once they began to understand what they could do with the internet; however they then became entangled in their vertically-integrated business models. Some launched their own proprietary systems and tried to negotiate their own exclusive content deals with movie and sport providers.

This forced the new players to develop the market independently, with over-the-top (OTT) and apps solutions, thus bypassing the telcos as much as possible. The clear winner has been YouTube, but other specialised video entertainment companies, including the broadcasters, have also performed significantly better in the video entertainment market.

But as we move into 2012-2013 a new direction will begin to emerge for this market. With more widespread availability of ADSL2+ broadband, the prospect of new business models on the NBN and a new look at triple play models IPTV is back on the agenda. Some of the up-and-coming providers profiled in this publication, such as the Telstra T-box, FetchTV, Quickflix and the ABC’s iView, will lead the revival of this market.

The new digital market has also affected the newspaper publishers, some of which have been among those hardest hit by the massive changes that are taking place as a consequence of rapidly changing digital technologies. In this publication we also discuss the ‘dumbing-down’ of their newspapers as a survival strategy. We provide an overview and analysis of the digital developments in some of these companies’ operations, as they try to retain their dominant position in the digitally-connected world.

We also supply information on smartphones and tablets, with a global overview. We report on the use of tablets and smartphones and highlight the major mobile media providers and the services they offer in relation to mobile content in Australia. We discuss why the on-deck services market has diminished following developments that have taken place since the release of the iPhone, Android and other smartphones, now with the increasing uptake of tablets.

However, while mobile web browsing and data usage are still growing exponentially these mobile devices require more and more data bandwidth, as the applications that are being developed for the mobile market also allow mobile TV and video to be streamed. Unfortunately the mobile operators are having trouble keeping up with these mobile broadband demands. Mobile TV viewers are watching content off-net and this now also includes recording and viewing of FTA TV. The use of mobile social TV is further reducing the average-revenue-per-user returns of the operators and their portals.

By early 2012 the number of users of the social networking sites continues to grow, with over 15 million users of the major social networking sites in Australia. Increased use of mobile broadband through mobile devices is driving consumer uptake, with many businesses now investing in social media and also expecting a return.

The converged networks are seeing gaming, music, movies and gambling merging, integrating and moving online as well. And growing penetration of fixed and mobile broadband networks will promote further growth in online gaming. In 2012 the Interactive Gambling Act is still under review and in this publication we provide some information, analysis and an overview of digital media developments in online gaming and gambling, along with survey results containing statistical information.

Market highlights:

  • The internet media companies are still maintaining leadership in this market;
  • Usage in the mobile media and data market continues to expand through the use of smartphones and tablets;
  • Revenue from the PSMS market is expected to drop in 2012 as other forms of use take precedence;
  • Copyright and online piracy battles over content are continuing between those with vested interests;
  • The NBN multicast service will enable RSPs to offer IPTV and other video content over the broadband network;
  • Video and image-based content may constitute more than 90% of consumer traffic by 2013;
  • Key trends for digital media companies;
  • ABC’s iView has been far more successful in IPTV than others;
  • Cloud-based music services allow streaming of millions of songs;
  • The number of Australians interacting with brands via social networks has jumped by more than 60%.
  • Online gaming and gambling is beginning to increase again, now that the initial effects of the GFC have passed in Australia.

Data in this report is the latest available at the time of preparation and may not include the current year.

Table of Contents

  • 1. Digital Media – Impact on the Media industry
    • 1.1 Market summary
    • 1.2 Market insights
      • 1.2.1 From calls to applications
      • 1.2.2 Expect delays and roadblocks
      • 1.2.3 Fragmentation, consolidation, mergers and acquisitions
      • 1.2.4 Where are the new opportunities?
      • 1.2.5 Think international
      • 1.2.6 Media and Telco's adapting business to the new Digital Economy
      • 1.2.7 Copyright and the Internet back in the Spotlight
    • 1.3 Whatever happened to media convergence?
      • 1.3.1 Convergence substitution
      • 1.3.2 New business models for media content required
    • 1.4 Media companies need to disaggregate and rebuild
    • 1.5 TV broadcasters
      • 1.5.1 Making progress
      • 1.5.2 Hulu
      • 1.5.3 DVR and advertising
    • 1.6 Radio broadcasters
      • 1.6.1 Digital radio
    • 1.7 Print media/newspaper publishers
      • 1.7.1 Newspaper publishers under pressure
      • 1.7.2 An interesting venture: Journalism Online
      • 1.7.3 The rise of online news paywalls
      • 1.7.4 Murdoch’s denial a death knell for publishers
      • 1.7.5 Digital e-readers
      • 1.7.6 Brand key in online media
    • 1.8 The video and DVD rental companies
      • 1.8.1 The end of the video store?
      • 1.8.2 DVD rental companies
      • 1.8.3 Interest grows for Video-On-Demand opportunities
    • 1.9 The anomaly of the mass media
      • 1.9.1 Analysis of media trends
  • 2. National Broadband Network – Changing the Media Model
    • 2.1 Open wholesale network key to change
      • 2.1.1 NBN Co’s multicast service
    • 2.2 Industry and market analysis
      • 2.2.1 Industry wants wrong piece of the NBN action
      • 2.2.2 Industry needs to start changing
      • 2.2.3 New business models
      • 2.2.4 Breaking out of the silo
      • 2.2.5 Trans-sector thinking
      • 2.2.6 Media companies well-positioned to operate trans-sectorally
      • 2.2.7 Risk will be unavoidable – not taking it will be deadly
    • 2.3 Digital media regulation
      • 2.3.1 Digital-only transmission
      • 2.3.2 Media reforms 2011-2013
  • 3. The Triple Play Market
    • 3.1 NBN ideal business changing the triple play model
    • 3.2 IPTV
    • 3.3 Broadband Voice Services (VOIP)
    • 3.4 the Three traditional elements
      • 3.4.1 Access
      • 3.4.2 Content
      • 3.4.3 Appliances
    • 3.5 Triple play basis for new pricing models
      • 3.5.1 Lower costs open up access to new models
      • 3.5.2 Price key to triple play
    • 3.6 What went wrong with triple play mark I - analysis?
      • 3.6.1 Failing Telco models
      • 3.6.2 VoIP and video – hard nuts to crack
      • 3.6.3 TV camera in front of radio programs
      • 3.6.4 The failure of portals
    • 3.7 The future of triple-play - analysis
      • 3.7.1 diversification of video content
      • 3.7.2 Tele-presence will be a killer app
      • 3.7.3 Triple play is an access product
      • 3.7.4 Different customer service models
      • 3.7.5 Triple play moving to the cloud
    • 3.8 The ACCC on triple play monopolies
  • 4. The IPTV Market
    • 4.1 Market Overview
      • 4.1.1 Introduction
      • 4.1.2 The first ten years
      • 4.1.3 The next decade
      • 4.1.4 Market surveys
      • 4.1.5 Optus copyright win – analysis
      • 4.1.6 Regulations and standards
    • 4.2 Major Players
      • 4.2.1 Introduction
      • 4.2.2 Telstra BigPond Media
      • 4.2.3 Optus TV
      • 4.2.4 Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)
      • 4.2.5 BBC iPlayer
      • 4.2.6 TPG
      • 4.2.7 FetchTV
      • 4.2.8 FOXTEL
      • 4.2.9 Hulu
      • 4.2.10 iiNet
      • 4.2.11 Internode
      • 4.2.12 Netbay
      • 4.2.13 Netflix heading Down Under?
      • 4.2.14 ninemsn
      • 4.2.15 Quickflix
      • 4.2.16 Seven Network
      • 4.2.17 Special Broadcasting Service (SBS)
      • 4.2.18 Ten Network
      • 4.2.19 TransACT
      • 4.2.20 VOD Pty Ltd
      • 4.2.21 IPTV for remote mining sites
  • 5. The Newspaper Publishing Market
    • 5.1 The future of mass media news
      • 5.1.1 Sharp decline in mass media usage
      • 5.1.2 Manipulating politics to increase revenues
      • 5.1.3 Sensations sell
      • 5.1.4 Perfect storm
      • 5.1.5 The buck stops with Rupert
      • 5.1.6 Politicians also have something to answer for
      • 5.1.7 The power of the internet
      • 5.1.8 Moving from print to digital from BuddeComm’s experience
      • 5.1.9 News media apps downloads
    • 5.2 Industry analysis
      • 5.2.1 Introduction
      • 5.2.2 Industry transformation is needed
      • 5.2.3 Wikileaks
      • 5.2.4 Glimpses of the e-publishing revolution
      • 5.2.5 Plenty of digital media opportunities
      • 5.2.6 Structural changes
      • 5.2.7 Moving to a digital world
      • 5.2.8 Rear mirror strategies
      • 5.2.9 Different roles for internet and printed papers according to study
    • 5.3 APN News and Media
      • 5.3.1 Overview
      • 5.3.2 Moving to digital
    • 5.4 News Corp and subsidiaries
      • 5.4.1 News Digital Media – Australia
    • 5.5 Fairfax Digital
      • 5.5.1 Background information
      • 5.5.2 Moving to a digital world
      • 5.5.3 Plans for revival of IPTV strategy
      • 5.5.4 Apps
      • 5.5.5 E-commerce payment provider
      • 5.5.6 Online travel website expansion
  • 6. The growing Social Network Market
    • 6.1 Social networks market summary
    • 6.2 Social Network trends in Australia
      • 6.2.1 New generations survey
      • 6.2.2 A growing market
      • 6.2.3 Australian employers use social networking sites to screen applicants
      • 6.2.4 Tweens taking up the technology challenge
      • 6.2.5 Small business not using social media
    • 6.3 Key social networks
      • 6.3.1 Introduction
      • 6.3.2 Facebook overtakes Google
      • 6.3.3 LinkedIn
      • 6.3.4 Twitter
      • 6.3.5 MySpace
      • 6.3.6 YouTube
    • 6.4 Statistical overview
      • 6.4.1 The increasing influence of social networks – to online sales
      • 6.4.2 Sharing, shouting and researching
      • 6.4.3 Use of social networks
    • 6.5 Mobile social networking
      • 6.5.1 Smartphones and LBS leading the surge
      • 6.5.2 The power of mobile media campaigns
    • 6.6 Personal social networks
    • 6.7 Incorporating social media
      • 6.7.1 The organisation or group challenge
      • 6.7.2 Crowdsourcing
    • 6.8 Conclusions and trends
  • 7. The Music, MP3 and Podcasting Market
    • 7.1 Market overview
      • 7.1.1 Brief analysis of trends globally and in Australia
      • 7.1.2 PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) survey to 2015 shows online music surging
      • 7.1.3 Australian digital music downloads to grow to $200 million a year
    • 7.2 Key players
      • 7.2.1 Apple
      • 7.2.2 The FIX and ninemsn
      • 7.2.3 Nokia
      • 7.2.4 Sony
      • 7.2.5 Telstra’s BigPond Music (BPM)
    • 7.3 An overview of some of the newer streaming players
      • 7.3.1 JB Hi-Fi Now
      • 7.3.2 Rara
      • 7.3.3 Rdio
      • 7.3.4 Take 40
  • 8. The Gaming and Gambling Market
    • 8.1 Market trends and activities
      • 8.1.1 Review of Interactive Gambling Act (2001) into 2011 - 2012
      • 8.1.2 R18 + gaming legislation
      • 8.1.3 Interactive gaming overview
      • 8.1.4 Updated information on the Australian gambling market
    • 8.2 Mobile gaming
      • 8.2.1 Global trends
    • 8.3 Online gambling
      • 8.3.1 Online market increasing into 2012
      • 8.3.2 A snapshot of the gambling industries – online and offline
      • 8.3.3 Betfair from Australia to the world
      • 8.3.4 Online gambling a global view
    • 8.4 Online gaming
      • 8.4.1 Background information
      • 8.4.2 Online gaming – market trends
      • 8.4.3 Video gaming increases
      • 8.4.4 Online gaming to move to the cloud – 2012
    • 8.5 Gaming surveys
      • 8.5.1 Digital Australia – 2012
      • 8.5.2 Online internet gambling participation rising – 2011
      • 8.5.3 2009 IGAA survey
      • 8.5.4 2008 IEAA survey
      • 8.5.5 2007 IEAA survey
    • 8.6 Background gaming information – 2005 - 2008
      • 8.6.1 Australasian Gaming Council report
      • 8.6.2 Australian Casino Association
      • 8.6.3 Some recent historical information on the Australian market
      • 8.6.4 Contribution of gambling to retail estimates – 2007
      • 8.6.5 Online gaming statistics – 2007
      • 8.6.6 Sky Racing – TAB Active TV betting
      • 8.6.7 Tabcorp internet revenues top $1 billion
  • 9. Mobile Media Market
    • 9.1 Surveys and Statistics
      • 9.1.1 Introduction
      • 9.1.2 Telstra surveys
      • 9.1.3 Australian Mobile Phone Lifestyle Index
      • 9.1.4 Mobile data usage increasing overall
      • 9.1.5 Smartphones are increasing takeup of media services
      • 9.1.6 Revenue statistics
    • 9.2 Mobile Media - Service Providers
      • 9.2.1 Mobile operators
      • 9.2.2 Service providers
    • 9.3 PSMS and Mobile Apps
      • 9.3.1 The market into 2012
      • 9.3.2 Previous analyses (updated in 2011)
      • 9.3.3 Smart phone apps market
      • 9.3.4 Consumer protection
      • 9.3.5 Key players in the premium rate SMS (PSMS) market
      • 9.3.6 PSMS revenues
    • 9.4 Mobile TV
      • 9.4.1 What is mobile TV?
      • 9.4.2 Market overview and analysis
      • 9.4.3 Major players
      • 9.4.4 Regulation
      • 9.4.5 Technology platforms
    • 9.5 Smartphones, Touchscreen Tablets and Handset Markets
      • 9.5.1 Historical handset market growth
      • 9.5.2 Global mobile handset statistics and forecasts
      • 9.5.3 Smartphones leaders
      • 9.5.4 Touchscreen tablets
      • 9.5.5 Other trends and developments
      • 9.5.6 Safety and security issues
  • 10. The competitive Internet Media environment
    • 10.1 Introduction and analyses
    • 10.2 Internet media companies
    • 10.3 Key trends for digital media companies
      • 10.3.1 Overview of media company activities
      • 10.3.2 Search services
      • 10.3.3 Digital media advertising
      • 10.3.4 Mobile sector
      • 10.3.5 Cloud Computing for media and entertainment sectors
    • 10.4 Brief case study: MySpace
    • 10.5 Brief case study: News Corp
      • 10.5.1 BSkyB
      • 10.5.2 Globalisation of media
      • 10.5.3 News Corp’s attempt to block free online news
  • 11. Glossary of Abbreviations
  • Table 1 – Worldwide advertising spend versus online advertising spend – 2009 – 2012
  • Table 2 – Growth of Hulu video streams – various months – 2008 - 2011
  • Table 3 – Most popular formats for receiving news in the USA – 2010
  • Table 4 – Growth of e-reader sales – 2009 - 2013
  • Table 5 – Estimated video streams by selected providers – 2008 - 2011
  • Table 6 – Quickflix – key performance indicators – 2008 - 2012
  • Table 7 – News media app downloads by brand – 2011
  • Table 8 – Revenue mix of the major newspapers publishers – 2011
  • Table 9 – Reading the newspaper versus website news information – 2010
  • Table 10 – APN key financial snapshot – 2010 - 2011
  • Table 11 – Fairfax Digital financial overview – 2008 - 2011
  • Table 12 – Top social networking sites in Australia – 2009 - 2012
  • Table 13 – Estimated social networking members by major sites in Australia – 2007; 2010 - 2012
  • Table 14 – Use of social media sites in Australia – 2011
  • Table 15 – Business use of social media sites in Australia – 2011
  • Table 16 – Internet distribution recorded music market sales – 2006 - 2015
  • Table 17 – Australian mobile phone recorded music market sales – 2007 - 2012
  • Table 18 – BPM standard download pricing – 2011- 2012
  • Table 19 – BigPond mobile music standard download pricing – 2011 - 2012
  • Table 20 – Gaming machine turnover versus machines in operation – 2001 - 2009
  • Table 21 – The ascendency of gaming machines – 1986/87 - 2008/09
  • Table 22 – Gambling revenue by ‘Official’ sector – 2009
  • Table 23 – Worldwide online gambling revenue – 1997; 2001; 2004; 2006; 2008, 2010
  • Table 24 – Estimated interactive gaming revenue and device penetration rate – 2009 - 2012
  • Table 25 – Gambling as a portion of hotels/licensed clubs and total retail (seasonally adjusted) – 2004 - 2007
  • Table 26 – Gambling in the retail trade (seasonally adjusted) – 2004 - 2007
  • Table 27 – Contribution of gambling to total turnover, by state (seasonally adjusted) – 2004 - 2007
  • Table 28 – Telstra average mobile broadband revenue per user per month – 2008 - 2012
  • Table 29 – Blended mobile data ARPU per customer by operator – 2010 - 2011
  • Table 30 – Estimated mobile data revenue by operator – 2009 - 2011
  • Table 31 – Overall estimated total mobile data revenue – 2008 - 2013
  • Table 32 – Cost of a music download for Vodafone pre/postpaid versus 3 subscribers – 2011
  • Table 33 – Mobi.moki key financial statistics – 2010 - 2011
  • Table 34 – Photon Group – key financial parameters – 2011 - 2012
  • Table 35 – App usage download by selected demographic – 2010 - 2011
  • Table 36 – App usage by mobile brand – 2011
  • Table 37 – Estimated app usage by selected demographic – 2011
  • Table 38 – Estimated app market revenue – 2009 - 2015
  • Table 39 – Users who pay for mobile applications by app type – 2010 - 2011
  • Table 40 – Mobile premium service complaints by major provider – 2010 - 2011
  • Table 41 – Estimated revenues – PSMS market – 2004 - 2012
  • Table 42 – Worldwide overall mobile handset sales – 2004 - 2013
  • Table 43 – Worldwide overall mobile handset sales by quarter – 2009 – Q1 2012
  • Table 44 – Mobile handset revenue worldwide – 2009 - 2014
  • Table 45 – Mobile handset sales regional market share - 2011
  • Table 46 – Handset supplier worldwide market shares – 1999 - 2011
  • Table 47 – Worldwide smart phone mobile device sales by quarter – 2009 – Q1 2012
  • Table 48 – Worldwide smartphone operating systems by market share – 2007 – 2010; Q3 2011
  • Exhibit 24 – Examples of Touchscreen Tablets
  • Table 49 – Worldwide touchscreen tablet operating system market share – mid 2010; mid 2011
  • Table 50 – Worldwide touchscreen tablet sales – 2010; 2011; 2015
  • Table 51 – Visitors to top web properties worldwide – 2008; June 2009; May 2011
  • Table 52 – Worldwide search engine market share – Mid 2011; Feb 2012
  • Table 53 – Worldwide advertising spending- all mediums – 2008 - 2012
  • Table 54 – Worldwide online advertising spending – 2007 - 2012
  • Table 55 – Most popular forms of online advertising
  • Table 56 – Google total advertising revenue and mobile advertising revenue – 2006 - 2012
  • Table 57 – Worldwide smart phone operating system market share – 2007 – 2010; Q3 2011
  • Chart 1 – Amount of online content access by Australians – 2010
  • Chart 2 – Audience market share of Australian video websites – 2010
  • Chart 3 – Overview of long term share trending Quickflix – 2005 - 2012
  • Chart 4 – Overview of share price Quickflix – 2011 - 2012
  • Chart 5 – Overview of the printed revenue mix of the major print publishers – 2011
  • Chart 6 – Overview of Fairfax Digital revenue broadcasting versus online – 2008 - 2011
  • Chart 7 – Overview of internet distributed recorded music market sales – 2006 - 2015
  • Chart 8 – Overview of gaming machine turnover – 1983 - 2009
  • Chart 9 – The ascendency of gaming machines – 1986/87 - 2008/09
  • Chart 10 – Gambling Revenue – The ‘Unofficial’ Growing Sector – 2009
  • Chart 11 – Overview of use of technology by seniors – 2011
  • Chart 12 – Overview of information services used by mobile phone users – 2009 - 2011
  • Chart 13 – Overview of Mobi.moki key financial statistics – 2010 - 2011
  • Chart 14 – Overview of Mobi.moki long-term share price trending – 2007 - 2012
  • Chart 15 – Overview of Australian apps market revenue estimates – 2009 - 2015
  • Chart 16 – Overview of estimates of smartphones versus other phones – 2011; 2013; 2015
  • Chart 17 – Overview of estimated revenues – PSMS market – 2004 - 2012
  • Chart 18 – Overview of PSMS revenue mix of downloads
  • Chart 19 – Overview of PSMS estimated market share by operator – 2011
  • Exhibit 1 - Case studies similar to the Optus case
  • Exhibit 2 – Quickflix at a glance – 2012
  • Exhibit 3 – Seven Network’s digital media strategies – 2006 - 2009
  • Exhibit 4 – MySpace a brief Australian look while under News Corporation
  • Exhibit 5 – LinkedIn at a glance – March 2012
  • Exhibit 6 – Foursquare
  • Exhibit 7 – The Obama campaign
  • Exhibit 8 – Examples of Web 2.0 developments
  • Exhibit 9 – Interactive gaming versus online gaming and online gambling defined
  • Exhibit 10 – Mobi.moki at a glance – 2011
  • Exhibit 11 – Overview of Be.interactive (previously Legion Interactive) before sale of Be.interactive companies – 2010 - 2011
  • Exhibit 12 – Be.interactive clients and partners
  • Exhibit 13 – Be.interactive mobile services
  • Exhibit 14 – Overview of MessageNet before sale of Be.interactive companies – 2010 - 2011
  • Exhibit 15 – Background information on Information Dialling Services (IDS)
  • Exhibit 16 – Gemalto
  • Exhibit 17 – Key national and major smaller players in the PSMS market
  • Exhibit 18 – Examples of Mobile TV technologies
  • Exhibit 19 – Billions in revenue from replacements handsets
  • Exhibit 20 – Handset prices in decline
  • Exhibit 21 – Spotlight on Apple iPhone
  • Exhibit 22 – Open Handset Alliance
  • Exhibit 23 – Spotlight on Nokia
  • Exhibit 25 – Satellite phone
  • Exhibit 26 – Key areas of focus for Internet media companies
  • Exhibit 27 – Digital advertising cost considerations
  • Exhibit 28 – Examples of large global advertising groups and subsidiaries
  • Exhibit 29 – Examples of digital advertising agencies
  • Exhibit 30 – Top sectors for online advertising spending
  • Exhibit 31 – Facebook

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Number of pages 206

Status Archived

Last updated 24 Apr 2012
Update History

Analyst: Paul Budde

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