2010 Australia - Internet, Broadband and Digital Economy Statistics (tables only)

Publication Overview

This tables only report provides 160 statistical tables for Internet, broadband and all aspects of the digital economy in Australia.

Researcher:- Paul Budde
Current publication date:- August 2010 (4th Edition)
Next publication date:- August 2011

Executive Summary

Australia’s Digital Economy in statistics

National Broadband Network

Australia is among the leading countries whose government is actively investigating the social and economic benefits that can be achieved through the deployment of a mainly fibre-based telecoms infrastructure. Services that depend on high quality broadband infrastructure include tele-health, e-education, e-business, digital media, e-government, smart meters etc. In countries where the national telco is lagging behind we see that local governments have no choice other than to take a leadership role, as they have done with similar infrastructure over the last 100 years.

The decision from the Australian government to launch a $43 billion national FttH broadband network is a clear indication that they believe broadband is essential infrastructure. It fulfils a national purpose as its trans-sector multiplier effect delivers massive social and economic benefits in healthcare, education, energy and the environment. A digital economy requires an open broadband infrastructure, and for that to work it can only be built by a utility (NBN Co). While there certainly are questions regarding the business model and the investment plan, there is widespread support for the visionary plan.

Internet and broadband statistics and forecasts

Broadband statistics provided relate to the number of subscribers and market shares of major providers as well as additional data relating to DSL, cable and other broadband technologies. Growth in recent years has been driven by further strong uptake of DSL subscribers, although recent growth has not as strong as the previous two years as the majority of the market has now made the transition from dial-up to broadband. In the longer term the development of a fibre optic network operated by a National Broadband operator is likely to have a significant impact on the take up of DSL or cable based services

The business market has been quick to embrace broadband and by 2009 the vast majority of the business sector had made the transition. Further growth is continuing in 2010. As business users gradually move to faster broadband access via ADSL2+ and, when it’s built, services from the fibre-based NBN, they are increasingly embracing new broadband applications.

HFC cable networks

The phasing out of dial-up internet connections in Australia has continued with nearly 90% of Internet connections now being non-dial-up. At the end of 2009 there were 935,000 cable broadband subscribers, a penetration rate of around 15% of the total broadband market in Australia. Telstra has indicated it will seek to expand the number of services it provides over its HFC network to compete with fibre-based services provided on a wholesale basis by a NBN operator. At the end of 2009, Telstra launched very high-speed Internet services in Melbourne. However, if the price of fibre-based services provided by the NBN operator is attractive to Telstra relative to the cost of servicing subscribers through an upgraded HFC network, then we may see Telstra abandon a strategy to upgrade the HFC in other major centres.

Free-to-Air Broadcasting

Market conditions and changes to technology have impacted the broadcasting industry over the past 12 months, and more so than any other year in the past decade. These conditions are expected to continue to impact the industry through intense competition for viewers and advertising. While the global financial crisis has left its mark on all media, Free TV in Australia weathered the storm better than expected. The formation of Freeview, the launch of Free TV’s new multi-channels and the expansion of the networks’ online and cross platform offerings are set to impact significantly on the industry’s free-to-air offering.

Pay TV Broadcasting

Due to the high cost of infrastructure and intense competition from the free-to-air counterparts, the two pay TV companies are battling it out to turn revenues into profits. However, the net losses of pay TV’s past are now narrowing and profits being restored. ARPU of both Austar and Foxtel continue to improve, driven by higher tier packages. By mid-2009 pay TV penetration had reached 33%, and while growth is expected to continue modestly during 2010, Australian figures are well below those of the developed markets around the world.

Digital TV

By 2009, Digital TV penetration had passed the 50% mark and steady growth is expected to continue. The free-to-air TV stations have increased their promotion of their digital TV channels and slowly but steadily there is more awareness among the viewers. However, the question remains if the new channels will attract enough new advertising money to warrant the new investments.

Radio broadcasting

Radio is available over AM and FM frequencies, and almost three-quarters of all radio is commercially operated. The ABC accounts for almost all of the remaining radio audience. All five major commercial radio broadcasters have established national networks through aggregation. Digital radio launched in Australia in 2009 after years of commercial trials. The launch has started in capital cities and will roll-out progressively to other broadcast centres. The cost to the radio industry to provide digital radio services is expected to be roughly between $300 and $400 million. By that time many industry experts believe that the radio industry could be overtaken by new technologies such as wireless Internet radio.

The Digital Media Industry

Most of the media companies have a vested interest in protecting their traditional businesses. Over the last 50 years they have been able to obtain certain political advantages that have allowed them to carve our monopolistic markets. The picture is still slightly blurred but it is becoming increasingly apparent that the traditional TV media is concentrating on digital TV. Separately, other activities are beginning to emerge – activities that we classify as digital economy (e-commerce, e-health, e-learning, smart grids, etc). The traditional media companies have all established themselves in the emerging digital media market, with Seven, Nine and the ABC being the first to enter. However, the ABC more rapidly increased their market share among digital viewers.

The Advertising Market

Defying market expectations, expenditure on online advertisements in Australia grew 18.5% year-on-year. Unabated by the current poor economic environment, sales reportedly increased to $1.8 billion at the end of the 2009 financial year. More specifically Australia’s online search advertising market achieved a 30% growth rate during 2008/09, with both revenues per ad and the amount of search ads served continuing to rise.

Online video media

Over recent years video applications over broadband have emerged, as Internet media companies and content producers seek to exploit the added speed and capacity of broadband infrastructure. The killer application on these networks is video-based communication, mainly produced by users themselves.

Music, MP3 and podcasting

Music has been the key driver behind the early developments in the digital media, both in mobile and fixed networks. While mobile is the preferred technology for listening to music, the business models are not conducive to helping people become accustomed to using these networks for music delivery. Most will use free or cheap Internet sites to gain access to music.

Social media networks

Social media developments are fascinating and exciting. They show the great potential of the new communication and information tools that are becoming available, thanks to the Internet, Web 2.0, email and broadband infrastructure. However, for these new social media tools to succeed they need to be fully integrated into our daily communication. Online gaming, particularly games based on virtual simulations, are increasingly becoming linked in with social networking services.

Mobile media

This market has remained fairly static over the past few years, with more and more activities moving ‘off deck’. The major mobile media providers, therefore, are now the digital media providers on the Internet who have established mobile device access to their services.

Premium rate SMS

Premium rate SMS services have developed into a $200 million market. However this is a far cry from the predictions made in the late 1990s, which anticipated a multibillion-dollar market. Despite a decade of mobile data hype the access charges to PSMS remain far too high and in 2009 the market began to contract.

E-health

E-health is rapidly shaping up as one of the key killer apps on the truly high-speed broadband networks, and millions of people around the world can potentially benefit from e-health applications. The Australian government is linking e-health developments to the National Broadband Network. Early diagnosis and post-treatment patient monitoring are two areas where significant synergies may be found using applications provided to users at home. As the financing of the public health systems in Australia becomes increasingly costly an opportunity exists to lower costs through more effective use of web services for healthcare consumers.

E-education

The Internet and associated Web 2.0 technologies have further broadened the quality and opportunities for remote education and the ‘virtual classroom’. E-learning is also becoming increasingly important in training health professionals in remote areas. Corporations and universities are continuing to adopt e-learning solutions in an effort to lower costs and provide training and education to a wider audience. It is thought that the current economic environment will see e-education growth being curtailed somewhat as companies rein in spending on non-essential training; however this climate may also promote technology as a cheaper alternative to classroom-style training.

E-government

The Australian government already provides its citizens with relatively sophisticated e-government services, and with the establishment of a fibre-based broadband network it may improve and broaden the range of web services for which it is responsible. As such, Australia is a fascinating and relatively advanced market for both e-education and e-government services.

Data in this report is the latest available at the time of preparation and may not be for the current year.

Table of Contents

  • 1. International comparisons
  • 2. Internet
    • 2.1 Infrastructure
    • 2.2 Internet access
    • 2.3 Internet content
    • 2.4 Internet usage
    • 2.5 Operator statistics
      • 2.5.1 Carriers
      • 2.5.2 ISPs
    • 2.6 Internet subscribers
    • 2.7 Industry finances
  • 3. Broadband
    • 3.1 International comparisons
    • 3.2 Infrastructure
    • 3.3 Subscribers
    • 3.4 Industry finances
    • 3.5 Operator statistics
  • 4. Broadcasting
    • 4.1 Digital TV
    • 4.2 Pay TV
      • 4.2.1 Industry statistics
      • 4.2.2 Operator statistics
    • 4.3 Radio
  • 5. Digital Economy
    • 5.1 Online content
      • 5.1.1 Top Australian websites
      • 5.1.2 International statistics
      • 5.1.3 Online entertainment
      • 5.1.4 Online music
      • 5.1.5 Gaming and gambling
      • 5.1.6 Mobile media
      • 5.1.7 International IPTV statistics
      • 5.1.8 Social networking
      • 5.1.9 e-commerce
      • 5.1.10 On-line advertising
      • 5.1.11 International statistics
      • 5.1.12 Mobile advertising
    • 5.2 e-Health
    • 5.3 E-government
    • Table 1 – Worldwide Internet users – 2000 - 2010
    • Table 2 – Fixed broadband access among Internet households – selected countries – 2004 - 2010
    • Table 3 – Market penetration of households with broadband access as a percentage of all households – Australia and selected countries – 2009
    • Table 4 – Households with access to a home computer and the Internet – Australia and selected countries – 2009
    • Table 5 – Selected country comparison of monthly at-home Internet usage – 2007; 2009
    • Table 6 – Computerisation in the home – 2009
    • Table 7 – SME computer equipment ownership trends – 1999 - 2009
    • Table 8 – SME computer software and hardware expenditure – 2006 - 2009
    • Table 9 – How SMEs access the internet – 2009
    • Table 10 – Infrastructure providers by number of ADSL-enabled exchanges – 2008; 2010
    • Table 11 – Number of DSLAMs by provider – 2006 - 2010
    • Table 12 – Security methods utilised for remote access to networks – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 13 – Devices used to connect to networks – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 14 – Total households with home Internet access – 2001 - 2009
    • Table 15 – Internet access households with children – 2001 - 2009
    • Table 16 – Internet access by region – 2001 - 2009
    • Table 17 – Employees’ work locations – home, workplace or off site – 2008 - 2010
    • Table 18 – Data downloaded by access technology – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 19 – Internet uptake by metropolitan/non-metropolitan area – 2007
    • Table 20 – Top 10 internet applications performed over four weeks – 2008
    • Table 21 – Top 10 internet activities – broadband versus dial-up – 2008
    • Table 22 – Telco product mix of customer spend – 2010
    • Table 23 – Weekly hours of internet usage by user type – 2006 - 2008
    • Table 24 – Frequency of internet use by age – 2008
    • Table 25 – Growth in residential and business data usage – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 26 – Business trends in Internet connections – 1995 - 2009
    • Table 27 – Business, government and household Internet subscribers – 2006 - 2009
    • Table 28 – Summary of current and expected uses of the Internet by SMEs – 2009
    • Table 29 – Overview total telecoms/Internet market – 2015
    • Table 30 – Service providers’ market share – 2010
    • Table 31 – Number of ISPs – 1995 - 2012
    • Table 32 – Number of ISPs by technology
    • Table 33 – Proportion of ISPs by size in the Australian market – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 34 – Dial-up and non-dial-up internet subscribers – 2003 - 2009
    • Table 35 – Internet subscribers by download speed – 2007 - 2009
    • Table 36 – Business, government and household Internet subscribers – 2007 - 2009
    • Table 37 – Internet subscribers by access technology – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 38 – Revenue mix – residential market – 2010
    • Table 39 – Telco product mix of customer spend – 2010
    • Table 40 – Business and government market spending – 2010
    • Table 41 – Worldwide broadband subscribers – 2003 - 2010; 2013
    • Table 42 – Top 10 countries worldwide by fixed broadband subscribers – Q1 2009
    • Table 43 – Broadband market share by technology – 2005; 2010; 2015
    • Table 44 – Broadband component of internet households – 2005 - 2010; 2015
    • Table 45 – Broadband market share by technology – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 46 – Number of ADSL and ADSL2+-enabled exchanges - January 2010
    • Table 47 – Broadband DSL retail subscribers by major provider – 2004 - 2010
    • Table 48 – ADSL2+ subscribers by provider – 2006 - 2009
    • Table 49 – Cable broadband subscribers by operator – 2002 - 2010
    • Table 50 – Homes connected to fibre – 2005 - 2010
    • Table 51 – Percentage breakdown of FttH communities by provider – 2010
    • Table 52 – FttH communities in Australia and New Zealand by provider – 2010
    • Table 53 – Changes in usage of non-voice applications on 3G handsets – 2010
    • Table 54 – Worldwide top 10 markets with FTTx penetration > 1% – 2007; 2009
    • Table 55 – Total broadband subscribers – 1996 - 2011
    • Table 56 – Broadband subscribers – total market – 2003 - 2010
    • Table 57 – Broadband subscribers – market shares (cable, ADSL, wireless totals) – 2004 - 2010
    • Table 58 – Broadband revenue – 2005; 2010; 2015
    • Table 59 – Broadband market – annual growth – 2004 - 2010
    • Table 60 – Total fixed wireless broadband monthly ARPU – 2005 - 2009
    • Table 61 – Broadband access revenues by major provider – 2005 - 2011
    • Table 62 – Annual change in broadband access revenues by major provider – 2006 - 2011
    • Table 63 – Market share of broadband access revenues by major provider – 2005 - 2011
    • Table 64 – Providers’ market share – 2010
    • Table 65 – Telstra DSL statistical overview – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 66 – Optus DSL statistical overview – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 67 – iiNet DSL statistical overview – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 68 – TPG DSL statistical overview – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 69 – Powertel/AAPT DSL statistical overview – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 70 – Primus DSL statistical overview – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 71 – Internode DSL statistical overview – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 72 – Household conversion to digital TV – 2009
    • Table 73 – Percentage of digital TV households – Q1 - Q3 2009
    • Table 74 – Annual unit sales in Australia; plasma and LCD digital TVs – 2003 - 2009
    • Table 75 – DVR subscribers – total market – pay TV and FTA TV – 2006 - 2010
    • Table 76 – Number of television and radio licences on issue – 2009
    • Table 77 – Pay TV rollout statistics (homes passed) – 1996 - 1998; 2002 - 2008
    • Table 78 – Pay TV household penetration rate – 1997 - 2010
    • Table 79 – Pay TV viewing versus FtA channel viewing – October 2009
    • Table 80 – Pay TV industry annual churn rates – 1996 - 2009
    • Table 81 – Net losses pay TV industry – 1996 - 2010
    • Table 82 – Pay TV advertising revenue – 2000 - 2013
    • Table 83 – Forecast pay TV household penetration – 2010 - 2012
    • Table 84 - Pay TV subscribers by operator – 1995 - 2010
    • Table 85 – Pay TV subscribers annual change by operator – 1997 - 2010
    • Table 86 – Pay TV revenue per operator – 1997 - 2010
    • Table 87 – Percentage change of pay TV revenue per operator – 1998 - 2010
    • Table 88 – ARPU levels per operator - Austar, Foxtel and Optus – 1999/2002; 2003 - 2010
    • Table 89 – Number of commercial and government radio stations
    • Table 90 – Number of commercial radio services by city
    • Table 91 – Radio ad revenue by city – three months to 30 September 2009
    • Table 92 – EIU e-readiness ranking – top 6 countries – 2008
    • Table 93 – Plans for convergence of data and voice networks – 2005, 2008, 2009
    • Table 94 – Home network penetration of households – 2005 - 2010; 2015
    • Table 95 – Nielsen top Australian websites by unique audience – July 2009
    • Table 96 – Worldwide online gambling revenue – 1997; 2001; 2004; 2006; 2008, 2010
    • Table 97 – Worldwide digital music revenue – 2007 - 2009
    • Table 98 – Worldwide revenue from online video – 2008; 2012
    • Table 99 – Number of online banking users worldwide – 2009; 2012
    • Table 100 – Number of consumers using health monitoring – North America; Western Europe – 2008; 2012
    • Table 101 – US online travel spending – 2006; 2008 - 2009; 2013
    • Table 102 – Online news readership versus print news in the US – 2006; 2008
    • Table 103 – Visitors to top web properties worldwide – 2008
    • Table 104 – Worldwide search engine market share – Q1 2009
    • Table 105 – Australian entertainment and media market revenue by industry – 2007 - 2012
    • Table 106 – Australian entertainment and media market – annual growth by industry – 2008 - 2012
    • Table 107 – Australian entertainment and media market – consumer/end user spending by industry – 2006 - 2008; 2011
    • Table 108 – Australian entertainment and media market – consumer/end user annual change by industry – 2007 - 2008; 2011
    • Table 109 – Australian entertainment and media market – advertising spending by industry – 2006 -2008; 2011
    • Table 110 – Australian entertainment and media market – advertising annual growth by industry – 2007 - 2008; 2011
    • Table 111 – Growth of Hulu video streams – 2008 - 2009
    • Table 112 – Australian Internet distribution recorded music market sales – 2007 - 2012
    • Table 113 – Australian mobile phone recorded music market sales – 2007 - 2012
    • Table 114 – Worldwide mobile gaming revenue – 2004 - 2009; 2013
    • Table 115 – Online gaming revenue market share – leading regions – 2012
    • Table 116 – Worldwide online gambling revenue – 1997; 2001; 2004; 2006; 2008, 2010
    • Table 117 – US video game revenue for console, PC, online and wireless – 2008
    • Table 118 – Worldwide mobile game users – global monthly averages – 2005; 2010
    • Table 119 – Total value of bets placed via mobile gambling worldwide – 2006; 2009; 2010
    • Table 120 – Online game advertising spend worldwide – 2007 - 2008; 2012
    • Table 121 – Australian Apps market revenue estimates – 2009 - 2015
    • Table 122 – Estimated revenues – PSMS market – 2004 - 2010
    • Table 123 – PSMS estimated market share by operator – 2009
    • Table 124 – Comparison of analysts’ mobile TV/video subscriber forecasts – 2009; 2011; 2013
    • Table 125 – Worldwide IPTV subscribers – comparison of analysts’ forecasts – 2008 - 2014
    • Table 126 – Estimated worldwide IPTV services revenue – 2006; 2009; 2014
    • Table 127 – Worldwide IPTV STB sales – 2007 - 2008
    • Table 128 – Worldwide IPTV equipment spending – 2007; 2013
    • Table 129 – IPTV subscribers in China – 2004 - 2012
    • Table 130 – PCCW NOW TV subscribers and ARPU – 2003 - 2009
    • Table 131 – IPTV subscribers and proportion of DSL base in France – 2004 - 2008
    • Table 132 – Forecast IPTV subscribers in Italy – 2006 - 2010
    • Table 133 – Users of social networking sites – 2009
    • Table 134 – Social networking in the workplace – 2009
    • Table 135 – Social networking amongst children – 2009
    • Table 136 – Online chat room use among children – 2009
    • Table 137 – Worldwide market share of mobile social network users – 2008; 2013
    • Table 138 – Australian consumer/end-user spending by industry – 2007 - 2012
    • Table 139 – Australian consumer/end-user spending – annual growth by industry – 2008 - 2012
    • Table 140 – Share of consumer spending by industry sector – 2006; 2011
    • Table 141 – Online advertising revenue and forecasts – 1997 - 2010
    • Table 142 – Australian online advertising revenue – 2006 - 2010
    • Table 143 – Market shares key online advertising markets – 2006; 2009 - 2010
    • Table 144 – Australian advertising spend – 2007 - 2012
    • Table 145 – Australian advertising spend – annual growth by industry – 2008 - 2012
    • Table 146 – Change in Australian ad revenue by sector – 2007 - 2010
    • Table 147 – Share of advertising revenue by industry sector – 2006; 2011
    • Table 148 – Paid search advertising revenue – 2005 - 2006; 2010
    • Table 149 – Worldwide online advertising spending – 2007 - 2009
    • Table 150 – Worldwide advertising spend versus online advertising spend – 2009 - 2010
    • Table 151 – Online advertising spending in the USA – 2000 - 2009
    • Table 152 – Online advertising revenues – top four portals in the US – 2006 - 2008
    • Table 153 – Worldwide mobile ad spending – 2008; 2013
    • Table 154 – Worldwide mobile TV ad spending – 2008; 2013
    • Table 155 – EIU e-readiness ranking – top 6 countries – 2008
    • Table 156 – Projected regional increases in total healthcare spending – 2020 - 2050
    • Table 157 – Number of consumers using health monitoring – North America; Western Europe – 2008; 2012
    • Table 158 – Market value and growth of e-health – 2009; 2012
    • Table 159 – Waseda University e-government ranking – 2008
    • Table 160 – Brookings Institution – highest e-government rankings – 2008

Annual Publication profile

Technologies

Broadband Fixed
Digital Economy
Digital Media
Internet
Mobile & Wireless Broadband and Media

Number of pages: 57

Status: Archived

Last update: 18 August 2010
View update history

Author: Paul Budde

NOTE: This report has been archived

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